MoCCA Fest Review

Hopefully any of my followers who would’ve gone to the Society of Illustrator’s annual Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art convention that happened this weekend didn’t need me to remind them about it, because I am off my game as a blogger lately; sorry!

Vacationland Book 1, by Jon Allen

Vacationland Book 1, by Jon Allen

Anyway, in lieu of a MoCCA Fest announcement, I thought I’d do a quick review of just some of the amazing artists I got to know!  In no particular order (besides alphabetical):

Mercworks comic, by Dave Mercier

Mercworks, by Dave Mercier

Jon Allen has a pretty depressing funny-animal comic, Ohio is for Sale, up on his website, and I was also very interested in his 3-part book Vacationland, about an in-the-family affair in a Maine vacation town.

Rachel Dukes‘ journal webcomic doesn’t update too frequently, and is mostly about her cat, but it’s adorable, and she has other comic stories up on her website too.

Dave Mercier’s Mercworks webcomic is good clean irreverent fun.

L. Nichols has an earthy style, appropriate for his Gardening Comics; I was especially interested in his Free People comic, combining images from a clothing catalog and found text for a new comic.

Toril Orlesky is a RISD alum and the creator of Hotblood!, a webcomic about centaurs in the old west (genius!).

Also, two poster designers!  Spur Design of Baltimore are the pretty high-brow, Society-of-Illustrators-award-winning illustration firm, whereas Matt Chic of Brooklyn brings his cartooning sensibility to his punky gig posters.

Hotblood!, by Toril Orlesky

Hotblood!, by Toril Orlesky

And finally, I’ll plug tomorrow’s New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium, featuring Sophie Yanow and Sam Alden, both published by Uncivilized Books which exhibited at MoCCA Fest.

Sophie Yanow will discuss her comics, especially her engagement with urban design, evident in her memoir and collaboration with Canadian Center for Architecture, and Sam Alden will discuss the effect of materials on comics narratives.

Annie Gave Me Noise, by Sophie Yanow

from Annie Gave Me Noise (2012), by Sophie Yanow

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OK! on PBS

1953 Oklahoma Poster

1953 mail order form for Oklahoma! revival (from the NYPL Digital Archives)

The last musical theater installment in PBS‘ Arts Fall Festival is Rodger & Hammerstein‘s 1943 musical, Oklahoma!, in a performance from the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain, originally from 1998, featuring singin’, dancin’ Wolverine (aka, Hugh Jackman).  9pm this Friday.

Al Hirschfeld Oklahoma! illustration

Al Hirschfeld caricature of 1969 Oklahoma! revival cast (from the NYPL Digital Archives)

Found this great Al Hirschfeld caricature of the 1969 revival cast on the NYPL Digital Archives, which reminds me that the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts has an exhibit on Hirschfeld’s theater illustrations up through January 4th.  Definitely worth checking out, he’s a fun one.

I’ll leave you with the one song I know how to play on the piano which happens to be from Oklahoma!  From the 1955 technicolor movie, with Gordon MacRae:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DLsZHVNOok&w=350&h=300]

Know your Attachment Limits, reblog

xkcd webcomic, File Transfer

Copyright Randall Munroe

On my other site today I featured an article about the best file sharing services for when email can’t handle your giant files, which reminded me of an old xkcd comic precisely about how awkward file sharing on the internet still is, and I shared my latest illustration commission, a poster for a forthcoming play in Philadelphia!  Check it out:

Know your Attachment Limits.

A Trained Librarian in Training

Sarah McIntyre Trained Librarian poster

Copyright Sarah McIntyre

This weekend I launched my more professional site, with my library school resume and art portfolio, and I’ll be blogging there too, on library stuff but also on comics, of course.  I’ll probably reblog the more relevant posts here, but if you’re interested in library & information science and want to give me a job, consider checking me out there too!

A Trained Librarian in Training.

via My New Blog!

Clemenza Comes and Goes

Sticking with the Metropolitan Opera today, NYC PBS stations will be airing this season’s production of Mozart‘s 1791 La Clemenza di Tito tonight at 8:30, with a repeat airing nationwide on  Sunday at noon.

Poster by Karl-Ernst Herrmann

1982 Poster from La Monnaie, Brussels; By Karl-Ernst Herrmann

If you can’t see it tonight, you can revisit my last post on La Clemenza for three free streaming performances courtesy of Opera Today and their collection of streaming audio.

I got the poster elsewhere entirely, by revisiting the digital archives of La Monnaie, which I’ve also mentioned before here.  Definitely a fun resource…  This poster in particular is based on a design by German set designer Karl-Ernst Herrmann.  Coincidentally, La Monnaie will present a new production of La Clemenza next season, a great reminder that these digital archives are the perfect place to see bygone productions…

1982 performance of La Clemenza di Tito at La Monnaie

1982 performance at La Monnaie; Photo by Oliver Herrmann.

Occupy San Diego Opera

San Diego Opera poster by R. Black

R. Black‘s posters for San Diego Opera‘s 2013 season

Sorta late on the bandwagon, but I’m loving San Diego Opera‘s posters for their 2013 season, created by a graphic artist more commonly associated with grassroots protest movements, R. Black.  An outside-the-box collaboration that proved fruitful!  There’s even a tenuous comics connection, since Dark Horse published a book of his work!

Back to the opera, SDO doesn’t seem to be the most adventurous house as a whole, but they did present two pretty unique operas this season…  One was Ildebrando Pizzetti‘s rarely heard 1958 Assassinio nella Cattedrale, based on T.S. Eliot‘s play on the 1170 assassination of Thomas Becket (aw yeah, medieval English history through an operatic Italian lens!).  The other was the world’s first mariachi opera, Cruzar la Cara de la Luna by José Pepe Martínez, director of Mariachi Vargas since 1975.

R. Black's posters for San Diego Opera

Both pretty rare, highly anticipated pieces, both wellreviewed.  Despite their rarity, it’s now possible to hear them both on Spotify!  Cruzar la Cara de la Luna was recorded at its Houston Grand Opera premiere, and the Pizzetti is represented by two recordings (I’d checked before, so these are new…).

Here’s the full first act  of the 1958 premiere performance of Assassinio nella Cattedrale from Spotify: